Pensacola, Florida Attorneys
IMG_6803.jpg

Articles of Interest | Shell Fleming Davis & Menge | Pensacola, FL Attorneys

Shell, Fleming, Davis and Menge, Pensacola Attorneys Since 1956.

Articles of Interest

Who Needs Estate Planning?

Estate planning isn't about how much money you have. It’s about protecting what you have—both for yourself while you’re alive and for your loved ones who should receive it after you’re gone. It ensures that what you have goes where you want it, the way you want, when you want.

Read More
Steven Gray
Estate Planning Attorneys

Would you have an optometrist do your heart surgery? Sounds like a silly question, right? However, the same could be said for choosing the right attorney for your estate planning. Unfortunately, the legal profession does not have as clearly defined specialties as the medical profession does. You have to do some research to be able to tell which attorney is qualified to guide you through your estate planning options.

Read More
Steven Gray
Power of Attorney

If you become sick or disabled, either temporarily or permanently, who will make decisions for you? There are two kinds of Power of Attorney. One allows someone you trust to manage your finances if you are unable to. The other kind allows someone you trust to make healthcare decisions for you. Every adult over 18 years of age should have both.

Read More
Steven Gray
Last Will and Testament

If you own assets in your name alone, they can quickly pass from you to the people you love—if you leave a Will. Without a Will, your assets pass according to the State's rules, also known as intestacy. The State may not pass your assets to the people you care about. In order to be sure your stuff goes where you want it to, you should leave a will.

Read More
Steven Gray
Irrevocable Trusts

While a Revocable Trust permits you to maintain full control (as Trustee) and have access to all your assets (as beneficiary), an Irrevocable Trust, once created, may prohibit your right to control the trust (as Trustee) or have access to your assets (as beneficiary), but you get to decide to what extent.

Read More
Steven Gray
Disabilities and Special Needs

If assets are left directly to a disabled beneficiary, they could disqualify him from state or federal programs under which he is receiving benefits. In 1993 Congress enacted new laws that entitled disabled individuals to derive the same estate planning benefits as non-disabled individuals without affecting their eligibility for state or federal benefits.

Read More
Steven Gray